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, arbitrary cuts would jeopardize our military readiness. they'd devastate priorities like education, energy, and medical research. they would certainly slow our recovery, and cost us hundreds of thousands of jobs. that's why democrats, republicans, business leaders, and economists have already said that these cuts, known here in washington as the sequester, are a really bad idea. now, some in this congress have proposed preventing only the defense cuts by making even bigger cuts to things like education and job training, medicare and social security benefits. that idea is even worse. yes, the biggest driver of our long-term debt is the rising cost of health care for an aging population. and those of us who care deeply about programs like medicare must embrace the need for modest reforms -- otherwise, our retirement programs will crowd out the investments we need for our children, and jeopardize the promise of a secure retirement for future generations. but we can't ask senior citizens and working families to shoulder the entire burden of deficit reduction while asking nothing more from the
cuts would jeopardize our military readiness. they'd devastate priorities like education, energy, and medical research. they would certainly slow our recovery, and cost us hundreds of thousands of jobs. democrats, republicans, business leaders, and economists have already said that these cuts, known here in washington as the sequester, are a really bad idea. now, some in this congress have proposed preventing only the defense cuts by making even bigger cuts to things like education and job training, medicare and social security benefits. that idea is even worse. [applause] yes, the biggest driver of our long-term debt is the rising cost of health care for an aging population. and those of us who care deeply about programs like medicare must embrace the need for modest reforms -- otherwise, our retirement programs will crowd out the investments we need for our children, and jeopardize the promise of a secure retirement for future generations. but we can't ask senior citizens and working families to shoulder the entire burden of deficit reduction while asking nothing more from the
, energy, and manufacturing, which will help the middle class. i think progressives are hoping he will put forward policies in line with his inaugural vision -- progressive, aggressive, and inspirational. that is what they are hoping to hear tonight. how host: about the selection of marco roby roma -- hamas host: -- host: how about the selection of marco rubio? guest: he has only been in the senate a couple of years. republicans are also looking past mitt romney's defeat. they are looking forward to someone who will deliver an address in both english and spanish. the republicans are losing hispanics, young voters, and women. rubio only has tea party appeal, but mass appeal. that is why his speech is so important, what he represents about the party's future. host: the tea party is also being represented in a separate response by senator rand paul. what does that suggest about the tea party influence in washington, and who speaks for them? guest: a great question. unlike a lot of things in the republican party right now, a lot of disarray, a lot of confusion. rimpau and marco rubio are not n
can equal a thousand years of energy. but what is going to happen to our innovation and what is happening to the jobs being created in wind and solar and waves and algae technology? what's going to happen to the electric car. no. we need to say yes to science and technology, yes to our health and our future. yes to local economies being able to sustain and say yes, we have clean water, we have vegetables, we have meat that is not -- animals that are not dying and fish not rising to the top of the lakes because of ground water coming up with methane and all the chemicals, most of which we don't even have disclosed to us to know. no gag orders on us to tell us. this is what we need. we need transparency. we need real information. we don't need the same advertising companies who told us it was ok to smoke and hospitals telling us that fracking is safe. no. we didn't believe you then. we don't believe you now. no fracking, no tar sands, yes on innovative technology for our future. we're not inheriting trillions of dollars of debt and water we can't drink. food we can't eat. no. s
at the energy sector, which has done tremendously well and could expand as well and do better under the next few quarters as it did over the past. pushingn't think it is us back into recession and i think if we prioritize the cuts -- that it would set the stage for doing even more of that down the road. any of you want to add anything to my soliloquy? >> in terms of energy, you are absolutely right. we have an opportunity to move forward to generate jobs, the, and energy security. it will take conscious decisions in making decisions about -- keystone xl pipeline. you will immediately start generating jobs and all the indirect effects. but unfortunately what we have is a debate against it for some reason that somehow the opponents of canadian oil stands thinks stopping keystone xl will stop developing the oil sands. it is not true. the oil sands are worth something like 10 times the gdp of canada. the notion it would not be developed is silly. if you really believe in environmentalism you'll bring that oil here because it's lower emissions. we need to make decisions in terms of exports of energy.
to achieve real growth until our economy. one of the best ways to encourage growth is through our energy industry. god also blessed america with abundant coal and natural gas. instead of wasting more money on companies let's open up federal land for exploration. we can grow our energy industry, it will make us energy independent and it will help bring administering back from places like china. simplifying our tax code will also help the middle class because it will make it easier for smaller businesses to hire and grow. we agree with the president, we should lowerer our corporate tax rate so companies will bring their money and jobs back here from overseas. we can also help grow the economy if we have a legal immigration system that allows us to attack the best and brightest. -- attract the best and the brightest. first, we must follow through on the broken promises of the past to secure our borders and enforce our laws. helping the middle class grow also requires an education system that brings the skills that jobs entail. we need to incentivize local schools and career training. we nee
and manufacturing, and energy, infrastructure, housing, all these will help entrepreneurs in small business owners expand and create new jobs. but none of it will matter unless we also equipped our citizens with the skills and training to fill those jobs. [applause] and that has to start at the earliest possible age. you know, study after study shows that the sooner a child begins learning, the better he or she does down the road. but today fewer than three in 10 four-year-olds are enrolled in a high quality preschool program. most middle-class parents cannot afford a few hundred bucks a week for a private preschool. and for poor kids, who need help the most, this lack of access to preschool education can shatter them for the rest of their lives. so tonight i propose working with states to make high-quality preschool available to every single child in america. [applause] every dollar we invest in high quality childhood education can save seven dollars later on by boosting regulation rates, reducing teen pregnancy, reducing violent crime. in states that make it a priority to educate our youngest ch
] can be prime minister explain why the energy bill contains no such commitment and why he is broken that promise? >> i have to say to the honorable gentleman he is completed wrong. the energy bill does exactly what i said in a house. it is legislating to force congress to give people the lowest tariff. >> thank you, mr. speaker. schools -- [shouting] >> i'm sorry to mr. speaker the opposition -- >> order. gift courtesy. there was a collective groan. [laughter] >> notably, notably on the opposition benches, and it's quite inexplicable. i have called for the good doctor. let's hear from the good doctor. [shouting] >> thank you, mr. speaker. schools in cambridge have been underfunded for decades by those after government and the previous one. the latest figures show people -- at 600 pounds per pupil per year less than english average. the worst in the entire country. does therime minister agree that this is simply unfair? will you support our school campaign and pledged to end this discrepancy in this parliament? >> primeinister spent i will look carefully at what my honorable friend s
government, everything, everything, post office, roads, transportation, justice, education, energy, defense, everything else is about $1 trillion. you all just heard what the deficit was last year. $1.3 trillion. which means we can do away with the entire federal government with the exception of medicare, medicaid and social security and we wouldn't even balance the budget. that's the magnitude of the challenge that we have. so it's incumbent upon us to come up with solutions, positive solutions. so what are we trying to do on the house republican side? our goals as we step back and look and try to focus on what the goals ought to be are to increase economic freedom, to provide economic greater opportunity for individuals, to balance the budget within a 10-year period of time so that we can create that economic vitality in this country and create jobs and pass off that wonderful great land of opportunity to our kids and our grandkids so that their dreams can be realized and not stifled. along those lines we've laid out a three to four honor month strategy that started a couple weeks ago whe
. there is a rhetorical energies spent about this, making the point that we want to make sure we keep our commitments to those who have invested for a lifetime and social security and medicare, a commitment i intend to keep. no one on either side of the aisle believes differently. if you saw that number and saw that we were going to increase by 40% by 2023, but you also knew that we would increase our 23, youce by 40% by 20 had the same number of taxpayers footing the bill, then you would not be nearly as alarmed by that number as you may be in a scenario that is different. i was hoping you could comment about the historical trend of how many taxpayers we have had purpose at the in those programs and where we are going in that same trend. >> we project that the labor force will grow much more slowly in the coming decades that and it has the past couple decades. one is the retirement of the baby boom generation. they boost the labor force growth. as they retire, they will hold it down. there is a end and the women's force participation. it pushed it up in the late last century. the labor force growth
and have a conversation. we have john felmy who will talk to us about energy. he won't do forecasting of energy prices but he'll talk about the energy situation and what we'll see in more exploration of energy supplies. it is something that his chamber has made a focal point of the growth strategy. it will be interesting to hear from john. we're also going to hear from frank nothaft. he's an expert i've known frank for -- i won't say because he looks younger than i do. it is a long time. he's an expert in the housing market and if that is one of the bright spots in the economy today. then finally, we're going have bob costello who is the chief economist at the a.t.a. we build stuff and we put it on trucks and move it around. if you keep track of the trucks you can keep track of the economy. i'm happy they all agreed to be here this morning. if you look at the u.s. economy you see an economy growing three and half years ago but the problem is it never hit its stride. it grew but it grew at 3.5%. we never made up the g.d.p. gap. so you have seen this chart in the recent c.b. o. but it i
of tennessee, and vice chair of the energy and commerce committee. then chris murphy, a democrat of connecticut. we will be right back. ♪ >> i think the women themselves in many cases were interested in politics, but had no vehicle to express that in their own lives, so they were attracted to men who were going to become a politically active or were already politically active. >> each of them, i find, intriguing. probably half of them, in particular, especially because they are so obscure historical. half of these women probably would be almost totally unrecognizable to most men and women on the street. >> this president's day, c-span premiere's its new series "first lady's couple -- "first ladies." we explore the lives of the women who serve as a first ladies from martha washington to michelle obama. season one begins monday night at 9:00 eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio, and c- span.org. what the program earlier live at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> saturday, booktv is in savannah, ga., for live coverage of the savannah book festival, starting at 10:15 eastern with vice-preside
security of our coming generations. it is how we figure out clean forms of energy, make medical advances that save lives, and ultimately reduce the cost of health care. develop the technologies that defend our country and make our fighting men and women safer and advance our economy. more than half, more than half of economic growth in this country since world war ii has resulted from technological advances. none of which would have been impossible or almost none of which would have been possible without the basic research funded by the federal government. sometimes this sounds very theoretical, but we live in it every day. let me hold up for you this morning this fetching little iphone. cannot get along without this thing. you all have one in your pocket. or perhaps you're looking at it right now and not listening to me. [laughter] which is pretty standard for us professors, so it is not surprising. this device that you have is in your pocket, and i have in mind, when not exist were it not for federally funded research. let me show you why. the gps that enables your device to guide you
that trend and take one oracle -- 1-2% of our economy every year to convert to green energy, we would be much further ahead. i'm so tired of the republican party to always be anti-green. we have an issue on this planet. i would like to see some things done in regard to that. green energy is important, and we should pursue it. thank you so much. guest: nobody is saying that it is not important. what they are seeing is that the federal government does not need the department of energy -- it does not need to be putting money into loan programs for companies like solyndra and fiskar. others -- they have gone bankrupt the. have gotten hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars for loan programs and all of those companies that got those loans with that taunt of money have gone bankrupt. something is wrong with the vetting process and something is wrong with technology that it is not working in the marketplace. i had solar panels on my house in tennessee as a test keys thursday as a test case 30 + years ago. they're looking to see if we could get enough heat units per day in solar panels. we never got
country. he is doing what he has to do. i am all for his proposals, all for clean energy and comprehensive immigration, i am for gun legislation. i am for all of them. i am center-left, that is progressive. i think the country is definitely going progressive. i do not understand where the republicans want to obstruct and go with their small mindedness and small government proposals that they think that they can push through on the american people that i do not think are very popular. host: we have a different opinion from twitter. host: david wright's in on twitter and says -- host: dan is up next in california, republican. caller: hello. i would like to reiterate what was just said. i am a retired federal employees. executive orders used to come few and far between. this president is misusing them to an extreme degree. as the lady put it a little bit ago, executive orders are not meant for executive fiat of anything the president dreams. he is going to ruin the balance of power in this country if he keeps it up. i think he should be impeached for what he has done. host: what you think of
with the clean chesapeake bay. we have an energy issue that still is with us. there are a lot of subject that is are out. there but when you're here a few days before march 1rks the fiscal issues are the ones i wanted to bring you up to date but i'll try to answer any questions have you on any of these issues. thank you very much. \[applause] >> thank you senator. please come and join me on the stage and we have people in the aisles holding microphones for people with questions. >> let me start with one while people are getting their thoughts together and lining up. i think all of us who work here at n.i.h. are inspired about the scientific opportunities we have now, unprecedented. you heard about some this morning. we feel like this a moment in history and yet we're not sure that message is fully get ago cross. i've had the chance in the last year and a half to meet with more than 200 members of the congress one on one to have a chance to explain what n.i.h. is all about. both parties, both houses, i would say all of those meetings have gone well because the case is so compelling and th
of you also served on. i completed my career here as chairman of the senate energy and natural resources committee. i will say to senator bennett, you may not think you are getting old, but clearly i am. i remember we have a bennett who was chief of staff of the budget committee. i was very young and at the bottom chair. he had the same name you do. it was your father. what a terrific thing to come here and see you today and ask .'s this. -- and expenses. -- and experience this. over 50% of the federal budget should put the country fiscal path for the future. this committee will play a critical role in achieving that role working with the president and with the secretary of the treasury. as you confront the fiscal challenges ahead, i cannot think of anyone more qualified or more ready for this job than jack lew. in only understands the challenges our country faces, but has the experience and judgment to confront them. as many know, jack has been a dedicated servant for many years. a servant of the people. what many do not know is where the dedication that she has originated -- that he ha
and energy to turn regions left behind by globalization into global centers of high-tech jobs. i asked this congress to help create a network of 15 of these hubs and guarantee the next revolution in manufacturing is made right here in america. we can get that done. host: president obama in his speech last night. we are posting your comments on facebook. if you want to post,, go to el facebook -- if you want to post your comments, go to facebook. tim ryan represents the youngstown area, a former manufacturing hub in that state and one that has been hit hard by recession. dakota, salem, oregon, republican. caller: good morning. as a college student very interested in economics, because that is what is helping me to fund my education, i like the policy initiatives that the president laid out in his speech, but that only goes so far. i think the president should do so much more in not doing just lip service. he can talk the talk, but he has to be willing to sit down with the legislators to actually do that. he needs to sit with those actually willing to listen, like stephen. before he and
the president thinks he can take. i do not think he has the ability to impose a national energy tax on americans without the authority of congress .arrie he may attempt to do this. >> what do you think about the plan to include in operations bill? >> there are a lot of options for how we move continuing resolutions. no decisions have been made about how to do that. thank you. >> what did you get mrs. boehner for valentine's day? >> good afternoon. we are on the floor about the legislation that affects -- we are running a few minutes late. this week on capitol hill we had the tail of two priorities. democrats want solutions, republicans want sequesters. democrats stand with the president's call for a balanced approach to create jobs, strengthen the middle class, grow the economy, and responsibly reduce the deficit. the publicans prefer delay and across the board cuts that are harmful. the education of our children, security of our country. on monday, i sent a letter to speaker boehner. the question i asked was, how can we leave for recess when we are so close to the sequester and we are so close
, we need to move away from that failed north korean policy to one with energy and creativity and focus, and i think we need to learn from what worked in the past until unfortunately those sanctions were lifted shortly after they were deployed because of the protests from north korea. so let's tackle north korea's illicit activities, its missile and drug proliferation where between that and its counterfeit currency program, that's how it gets close to 50% of its hard currency. this regime will do anything for money, obviously, as south koreans will tell you, it's a gangster regime. but let's interview with those shipments. let's disrupt the bank accounts that is used. let's ramp up the radio broadcasts into the country where there is evidence the information wall is cracking. 37% of those people that flee the regime today say they're listening to broadcasts or they're accessing information that is telling them about what's happening in the outside world and what's really going on in their own country. and that's the kind of information we have to get into this regime. and let's help the
work together somewhat back and as well. i like her style. i like her energy. and i think she is determined, and as i am, to get us back to regular order. she and i talked about that today. i think we will see a different senate operation now. hopefully. i think she is capable of doing that and i think she is headed in that direction. and, by the way, nita loy, she is the first appropriations director of the house side. >> de you think -- >> i think paul ryan, the chairman of the house committee, has been in contact with senator murray. i think they're both very practical-minded people and understand that this is a practical place where we are talking about here. i hope and trust that the budget committees will agree on a single number so that we can do our job, which cannot do otherwise. >> are closely do you work with paul ryan? >> very well. he is a bright guy. he understands what our predicament is on appropriations, that we are limited on what we can do, on the big number that he gives us and the budget resolution is. he understands that and he sympathizes with their pred
things and all of them will stress the economic context. energy. infrastructure, which is new roads and bridges and things like that. manufacturing. and education and making colleges more affordable. and how we to make our economy grows stronger and promotes and grow the middle class. host: is the headline in the financial times -- how much of this will echo what we heard at the inaugural address? guest: i think it will be a little different from that. there were many comments after the inaugural address. it was very aggressive. he talked about gave rights, equal pay for women, voting rights. i think you'll see some of that, but my sense is you will see all of those pins that can come into an economic context. while he might talk about immigration, what we need to do as a country as that, it will be in the vein of how do we help the economy? host: jonathan strong? guest: i was at a retreat that the house democrats held last week in virginia. the president gave a speech to them in a preview of what he was going to say. ito quite an aggressive tone in terms of the standoff with republ
? >> roughly, yes. >> and there's a lot of rhetorical energy spent around this building, appropriately so, making the point that we want to make sure we keep our commitments to those who have invested through a lifetime of social security and medicare. certainly a commitment i intend to keep. i know of no one on either side of the aisle who believes any differently. if you saw that number and saw that we were going to increase by 40% by 2023, but you also knew that we were going to increase our work force by 40%, by 2023, so that you had the same number of taxpayers putting -- footing the bill for those benefits, or at least per recipient, then you wouldn't be neerm as alarmed by that number as you might be in a scenario that's far different. so i was hoping you could comment just a minute about maybe the historical trend of how many taxpayers we've had per recipient in those programs and where we're going in that same trend. >> yes, congressman. so, we project that the labor force will grow much more slowly in the coming decade than it has grown over the past several decades. and there a
. energy, he'll talk about infrastructure, which is new, new roads, new bridge, stuff like that, manufacturing -- manufacturing, and then he'll also talk about education and making college more affordable. but all of that will be in the context of how can we make our economy grow stronger, how with can -- how can we promote and grow the middle class. host: here's the headline of the financial times d this morning. obama to focus attention on the economy. speech to be heavy on home initiatives. how much of this will echo what we heard at the inaugural address? guest: i think it will be a little bit different from that. i think there were a lot of comments after the inaugural address that he was aggressive on social issues. he talked about gay rights, equal pay for women, voting rights, and i think you'll see some of that but my sense is that you'll see only the things that sort of can come into an economic context. so while he might talk about immigration, what we need to do as a country on that, it will be in the vein of how does that help the economy? host: how significant is t
security than today. >> roughly yes, congressman. >> there is a rhetorical energies spent about this, making the point that we want to make sure we keep our commitments to those who have invested for a lifetime in social security and medicare, a commitment i intend to keep. no one on either side of the aisle believes differently. if you saw that number and saw that we were going to increase by 40% by 2023, but you also knew that we would increase our workforce by 40% by 2023 so you had the same number of taxpayers footing the bill for those benefits, then you would not be nearly as alarmed by that number as you may be in a scenario that is different. i was hoping you could comment about the historical trend of how many taxpayers we have had purpose at the in those programs -- per recippient in those programs and where we are going in that same trend. >> we project that the labor force will grow much more slowly in the coming decades than and it has the past couple decades. one is the retirement of the baby boom generation. they boosted the labor force growth. as they retire, they wil
to this global order are readily observed in roller coaster energy prices -- destruction to this global order are readily observed in roller coaster energy prices. failure to provide leadership in the collective security of this global order would have significant economic consequences for the american people. worse, the lapse in american leadership would create avoid in which old threads would be unaddressed and new security challenges would find room to grow. there should be no misunderstanding. the combined effect of continuing resolution and sequestration will have dilatory is effect on the stability of the global order -- deleterious effects on the stability of the global order. sequestration should not be viewed solely as a budget issue. our collective actions in the next months will be scrutinized on the global stage. even the perception of a disruption over a nation's ability to protect its global interest could have strategic consequences. regarding risk to our forces, the linkage between resources and readiness is immediate and visible. the scale and abrupt implementation of sequest
legislate to force energy companies to put customers on the lowest tariff. will he explain why his energy bill contains no such commitment and why he has broken that promise? >> i have to tell the honorable gentleman that he is completely wrong. the energy bill does exactly what i said in the house; it is about legislating to force companies to give people the lowest tariff. >> oh, no. >> order. it is very discourteous of the house to issue a collective groan-notably on the opposition benches. it is quite inexplicable. i have called the good doctor; let us hear from the good doctor. >> schools in cambridgeshire were underfunded for decades by both the last labour government and the one before that, and the latest figure shows that they receive £600 per pupil per year less than the english average-the worst funding in the entire country. does the prime minister agree that that is simply unfair? will he support the cambridge news "fair deal for our schools" campaign, and pledge to end the discrepancy during the current parliament? >> i will consider carefully what my honorable friend has s
on "washington journal." and in about 45 minutes, we will talk about energy and climate issues with republican issues with republican representative marsha blackburn
people, and legislating so the get the lowest tariff on the energy bill. that's what we have done. we're having a top rate tax that is lower than any year when he was -- lower -- higher. perhaps he can confirm this because i have an invitation. he is going to make a major speech tomorrow, and i've got the invitation. this is the invitation that's been said that the ed miliband is going to make a major speech on the economy on thursday. it won't have any new policies in at. [laughter] >> ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, mr. speaker, let me tell him, let me tell him, let me tell him, he would be most welcome to attend the speech and he might learn something. [laughter] and every week, and every week that goes by, the evidence mounts against them on the economy. there's a living standards crisis for the many, and all he does is stand up for a few at the top. wee got a feeling prime nister. he's out of touch and he stands upor the wrong people. >> once again we've heard nothing to say about the deficit, nothing to say about welfare, nothing to say about growth. and i was going to make a speec
the lowest tariff on their energy bills. while having a top rate of tax that is higher than any year when he was in the treasury. the right honorable gentleman talks about important political events and speeches, and perhaps he will confirm something. i have here an invitation. he is going to make a major speech tomorrow, and i have the invitation. this is the invitation that has been sent out: "ed miliband is going to make a 'major' speech on the economy on thursday. policieshave any new in it,". >> let me tell the prime minister that he would be most welcome to attend the speech and he might learn something. every week that goes by, evidence mounts against the government on the economy. there is a living standards crisis for the many and all he does is stand up for a few at the top. we have a failing prime minister; he is out of touch, and he stands up for the wrong people. >> once again, the right honorable gentleman has nothing to say about the deficit, nothing to say about welfare, and nothing to say about growth. now he is going to make a speech tomorrow, which he kindly invites me to,
and mapping it to understand that when i like clean energy on facebook and i tweet out something about green energy, that is a same interest of mine. >> are different companies go to do it differently, is this something that everyone will have to move in the same direction on? you have to understand what the ontology of entities is. how are things name, how are they organized into hierarchies? for example, you need to know that wisconsin is a state and that there are cities inside of it. if i say i like wisconsin there are a whole bunch of interest that passed it off of that. he need to understand that hierarchy of objects. you also need to understand how they relate to each other. >> does this personalization become complementary to search, does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the othe
the optimism of leaders shaping their own community, the energy of people making their own decisions, the pride of a tribal nation unleashing its own potential. in many ways, my own experience and my tribe's experience reflect not just indian country's advances but our aspirations, that our communities might thrive in a modern, global economy that, our children might achieve their dreams, and today, more than ever, those aspirations are within our reach. thanks to a greater trust between tribal nations and the united states, we're in a moment of real possibility. in president obama and his administration, we have a partner committed to strengthening tribal sovereignty, who believes in our right to determine our own course, who understands what we've always known to be true, that indian nations are best governed by indian people. [applause] this partisanship and partnership extends throughout the federal government, on both sides of the aisle, because indian issues are not partisan issues. the results has had a meaningful, measurable impact on indian people's lives. today, more tribes are managi
is in her sixth term. she is a vice chair of the energy and commerce committee. on the republican line from maryland, barbara. caller: i am a republican, and i am fully in support of president obama ending these wars. i am an antiwar person. i think it is a misallocation of our resources, and i am sick and tired of my party always pushing one war after another. it seems like this is a business, and that is why we are conducting them. i second point is, you talk about free market -- we do not have a free market anymore. the markets are manipulated by the people that control the money, as well as the industries. that is what globalization is about. here is one last point. for example, electric cars, solar panels -- that was around 50 years ago. president carter even had solar panels on the white house. if our government would have been smart back then to continue that trend and take one percent or two percent of our economy every year, and convert it to green energy, people would be much further ahead. i am so tired of the republican party to always be anti-green. we have an issue on this pla
energy want to put behind your decisions. i came to understand that i had control of my own destiny. at that point, i did not hate poverty anymore. i knew it was only temporary. i knew i could change that. to continue on the theme of education, in 1831, alexis day tocqueville came to america to study this country. europeans were fascinated. how could a fledgling nation be competing with them on virtually every level? this is impossible. the total was one to sort it out. he looked at our government -- cqueville was impressed. he said this is really something. he said, let me look at their education system. he was blown away. anybody finishing the second grade was completely literate. he could find a mountain man on the outskirts of society. he could have a political discussion. he could tell him how the government worked. take a look at the chapter on education in my latest group, "america the beautiful," which a writ with my wife. in that chapter, you will see questions extracted from the sixth grade exit exam from the 1800's. i doubt most college graduates to they can pass the test
change, energy, transportation, medicare, social security, defense spending, immigration reform, gun violence, and even our postal system. we need to find that urgency to start to create a sensible energy policy that confronts climate change and reduces our reliance on foreign oil. we need that urgency to formulate a transportation plan so that states can address their crumbling infrastructure. and local businesses can get back to work. we need that urgency of now to reconfigure our security policy. make sensible cuts and fashion a force that prepares us for conflicts of the future and not the past. we need the urgency of now to make sensible changes to social security and medicare to ensure the vitality of these programs for generations to come. batered -- it will reward us with a more sensible energy policy, good roads, and a sustainable social welfare system. we will be rewarded with the stable economy and reduced market volatility. we cannot wait to act. we are borrowing 42 cents for every dollar we spend. we have to take sensible steps to begin reducing our debt without stepping
enforcement officer said very recently, the energy in an assault weapon bullet will tear open a brick wall. you don't need that to go hunting. you don't need that to protect yourself and your home. i yield to the gentlelady from new york, carolyn maloney. mrs. maloney: i would like to yield to my inspiration in so many ways, we share the same name. carolyn mccarthy, on this issue from new york, she is our spokesperson. miss mccarthy: i want to thank my -- mrs. mccarthy: i want to thank my colleagues for having this hour and break up some of the myths out there on what we are hearing, not only in the papers but certainly from so many n.r.a. members. i have been battling this, many of us have been battling this issue for many, many years. i think that what happened just about two months today the newtown shooting happened. and that went through everybody's heart. to think in this day and age that we could have a shooting that totally rips apart 20 children. unacceptable to the american people. unacceptable to the american people. since that, being that we are trying to give as much informati
, energy, infrastructure, but that is where the future lies. i would like to respond to our colleagues from the uk. we have a lot of history behind us. and i will not say anything about the support you should have given to mr. deval, general the ball at that time. ul,given to mr. gega general degaul at that time. but i sometimes agree with mr. cameron is the party give us in our deployment tamale, he was the first to be so and he was the first to offer material support in our deployment to ma li. so i will not be so crude as to make a caricature of a country where political leader. i thank the u.k. and i also note that david cameron supports marriage for all, and that ain't -- that makes things easier for us in france as well. let me reply on the major issues affecting europe, and the questions put to me. young people, our continent is getting older. the birth rate is low. certainly, in sufficient. -- not sufficient. our policies, our choices call into question the role of young people in our society. if there's one thing that is worth our coming together, preparing the budget and the rest,
. what can he get passed in the united states senate? the president wants to propose an energy tax. the president wants more stimulus spending, there will be no -- doesn't create jobs. i would expect the united states senate to go ahead and take it up. if the president wants more tax hikes that destroy jobs, then as democrat allies in the senate ought to take it up. this isn't the agenda that many americans are looking for, and i think many in the president's own party won't support those ideas. in the house we're going to continue to focus on what the american people's top priorities are -- creating jobs and cutting spending. for the last two years the house has done its work. we've passed legislation to tackle the tough challenges that america faces only to see our senate colleagues do nothing. well, those days are over. the house will continue to meet other obligations, but senate democrats must begin to do their work. that's why we passed the no budget no pay act, requiring the senate to pass a budget for the first time in four years. and that's why we're going to insist that t
pursuing in a grand campaign his civil war was the tax campaign. he poured his energy into that instead and did prevail in the tax campaign in 1926. he won the presidency out standingly. can you imagine your son dies and you win in 1924 as president beating the third party, the progressive party and the democrats come bind. the republicans had the absolute majority in 1924 even though a lot of the progress ives were former republicans. so he was tremendously popular because of his perseverance in part. but this story of calvin just came over thesm. and you can see after the presidency mrs. coolidge felt free to write about calvin. they didn't go out in sorrow about the child. afterwards there is a poem that we have that she wrote and of course it changed their life forever. calvin it was child who expresses the things you want expressed but i want to give credit to john for opening the window to john, not competing with him. calvin said when he worked in the tobacco field, that's the photo -- someone said if my dad were vice president or president i wouldn't work in any tobacco field. c
extraordinary talents and energy. limits on religious freedom, every impediment to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. after president of the united states, he could only become president of the world. the praise the respect he receives from both sides of the aisle says big volumes about his character. the man he defeated, former president george h. w. bush said, if clinton were the titanic, the iceberg would have sunk. it has less to do with this sharp political acumen and more to do with his deeply held values and ideals. bill clinton believes in an america that is tied in a single garment of destiny. our fates are bound together and we should work together. a man from hope continues to work to give hope to millions. bill clinton has taught us that while hope is a powerful motivator, it takes more than that to build the future we dream of. as we revitalize our discussion about how to renew the american dream, i ask you to join me in welcoming a great proponent of the american dream, the honorable william jefferson clinton. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you.
still make critical investments in education, energy, while also balancing budgets committee responsible spending cuts. >> thank you, madam chair. i want to disagree with those who say we have a spending problem. when they talk about it, like there is an assumption that somehow we are a nation broke and cannot afford these things any longer. we are too broke to invest in education and housing. we are the richest nation in the history of the world. we are now the richest nation in the world. we have the highest per-capita income of any major nation. if we are so rich, what are we so broke? is it a spending problem? no. it is because we have a misallocation of capital. and the wealth. all of this wealth that has been built up by hard working americans has been accumulating into fewer hands. then we have a tax code that is skewed toward the wealthy. a tax cut whittled with -- a tax code riddled with loopholes. that allows the wealthy had to fund manager to pay less rate of taxes that a nurse, for example. it is very interesting that all this talk we have about sequester talks about the prog
that will allow us to harvest more of our energy and put more people to back to work repairing our crumbling roads and bridges. these steps will help our businesses expand and create new jobs. we also need to provide every american with the skills and training that they need to fill those jobs. let's start in the earliest years by offering high-quality preschool to every child in america. we know kids in these programs you better throughout their lives. let's redesign our high schools so that our students graduate with the skills that employers are looking for right now. because taxpayers cannot continue to subsidize the soaring cost of higher education, i call on congress to take affordability and value into account when determining which colleges receive certain types of federal aid. those are steps we can take to bring good jobs to america and equip people with the skills those jobs require. that brings us to the third question, how do we make sure that hard work leads to a decent living? no one in america should work full-time and raise children in poverty. let's raise the minimum wage. it is
to harness more of our energy and put people back to work repairing our roads and bridges. we also need to provide every american with the skills and training that they need to fulfill those jobs. lester in the earliest years by offering high-quality pre- school to kids. let's make sure our students graduate with the skills that employers are looking for right now. because taxpayers cannot continue to subsidize the soaring costs of higher education, we look for affordability and value into account. those are steps that we can take to help bring good jobs to america and equip it but with the skills that those jobs require. that brings us to the third question -- how to make sure that hard work leads to a decent living? no one should work full- time and raise their children in poverty. let's raise the minimum wage so it is one that people can live on. let's also pass comprehensive immigration reform and secure the borders and establish a responsible path to citizenship and attracting the highest skilled engineers to help create jobs. these steps will help grow our economy and rebuild a ri
standpoint, item by item. the new defense that energy that we crafted under president obama posey leadership only one year ago. it is not that we do not understand that the department of defense needs to make a contribution to the nation's capital situation resolution. that is why we have accommodated billions of dollars in cuts over the next 10 years. they are beginning to make that enormous transition. that was on top of several hundred billions of dollars of cuts that secretary gates began, eliminating unneeded and underperforming programs. all of this is on top of the historic reductions associated with the winding down of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. i also understand that the taxpayer deserves very careful use of each and every defense dollar that we do get from you. that is why we have striven and will continue to strive to get better buy-in power for defense dollar. -- buying power for defense dollar. but they use of the taxpayer dollar is undermined by the sequestration. sequestration is not the result of an emergency. it is not because discretionary cuts are the answer to the
not mean we cannot still make critical investments in education, energy, while also balancing budgets committee responsible spending cuts. >> thank you, madam chair. i want to disagree with those who say we have a spending problem. when they talk about it, like there is an assumption that somehow we are a nation broke and cannot afford these things any longer. we are too broke to invest in education and housing. we are the richest nation in the history of the world. we are now the richest nation in the world. we have the highest per-capita income of any major nation. if we are so rich, what are we so broke? is it a spending problem? no. it is because we have a misallocation of capital. and the wealth. all of this wealth that has been built up by hard working americans has been accumulating into fewer hands. then we have a tax code that is skewed toward the wealthy. a tax cut whittled with loopholes -- a tax code riddled with loopholes. that allows the wealthy had to fund manager to pay less rate of taxes that a nurse, for example. it is very interesting that all this talk we have abou
of our coming generations. it is how we figure out clean forms of energy, make medical advances that save lives, and ultimately reduce the cost of health care, develop the technologies that defend our country, and make our fighting men and women safer and advance our economy. loore than half, more than half of economic growth in this country since wor the e war ii s resulted from technological advances, none of which would have been impossible or almost none of which would have been possible without the basic research funded by the federal government. sometimes this sounds very theoretical, but we live in it every day. let me hold up for you this morning this fetching little i6 c13 one. cannot get along without this thing. rt eou all have one in your pocket. or perhaps you're looking at it right now and not listening to me. which is pretty standard for us professors, so it is not surprising. this device that you have is in your pocket, and i have in min ad would not exist were it not for federally funded research. let me show you why. the gps that enables your device to guide you to your
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